Anthologies   •   A Jug of Punch—Broadside Ballads Old and New

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  • A Jug of Punch — Broadside Ballads Old and New
    • 1960 - HMV CLP 1327 LP (UK)
    • 1960 - EMI XLP 5003 LP (UK)
  • Side One
    1. Nancy Whiskey — Jimmie Macgregor
    2. Higher Germanie — Shirley Collins
    3. Monaghan Fair/Irish Reel — Frank McPeake
    4. I Don't Mind If I Do — Steve Benbow
    5. Twankydillo — Bob and Ron Copper
    6. The Beggar Wench — Isabel Sutherland
    7. Brian O'Linn — Seamus Ennis
    8. Ratcliffe Highway — Frank Purslow
    9. Jack Tar on the Shore — Steve Benbow
  • Side Two
    1. The Light Bob's Lassie — Isabel Sutherland
    2. Football Crazy — Seamus Ennis
    3. Bold Robinson — Frank Purslow
    4. The Sugar Ray Robinson—Randolph Turpin Fight — Steve Benbow
    5. The Horse Named Bill — Shirley Collins
    6. When the Old Dun Cow Caught Fire — Bob Copper
    7. Grat for Gruel — Jimmie Macgregor
    8. The Jug of Punch — Frank McPeake
    9. Jack Hall — Steve Benbow

  • Musicians
    • Steve Benbow: Vocals & Guitar (Tracks: 4, 9, 13, 16, 18)
    • Shirley Bland: Backing Vocals (Tracks: 1)
    • Shirley Collins: Vocals (Tracks: 2, 14), Backing Vocals (Tracks: 1)
    • Bob And Ron Copper: Vocals (Tracks: 5, 15)
    • Séamus Ennis: Vocals (Tracks: 7, 11), Whistle (Tracks: 2, 7, 11, 14, 16)
    • Perry Friedmann: Banjo (Tracks: 2, 6-8, 10, 12-14, 16)
    • Peter Kennedy: Guitar (Tracks: 15)
    • Jimmie Macgregor: Vocals (Tracks: 1, 16), Guitar (Tracks: 1), Mandolin (Tracks: 7, 9, 11)
    • Frank McPeake: Vocals (Tracks: 17), Irish Bagpipes (Tracks: 3, 17)
    • Vic Pitt: Bass (Tracks: 1, 9, 11, 13, 16)
    • Frank Purslow: Vocals (Tracks: 8, 12)
    • Isabel Sutherland: Vocals (Tracks: 6, 10)
  • Credits
    • Edited and recorded by Peter Kennedy for The English Folk Dance and Song Society
    • Recorded at Cecil Sharp House, London
    • Cover designed by Austin John Marshall

Sleeve Notes (Excerpts)

The Country Ceilidh has long been enjoyed by people living in the more remote communities of the British Isles, but with the growing popularity of portable song-accompanying instruments like the guitar, the ceilidh craze is spreading into the cities. Every day in London you can see guitars being carried through the streets by young people going to a coffee bar, pub, back-kitchen, garage, garden shed or even a secondary school playground. The guitars are not in cases, they are carried naked and unashamed for their owners are proudly demonstrative of their newly-found social recreation.

Ceilidh (pronounced Cayley) is a Gaelic word which means a friendly visit. Neighbours gather for an evening swapping songs, instrumental tunes and stories. Fiddle fingers and tuneful tongues may be loosened by a sense of local competition and perhaps also with the aid of a jug of punch.

As the desire for this home-made music-making is on the increase, so is there a need for more and more swapping of more and more songs. The Songs on this record are nil good ceilidh songs well suited to social gatherings. The Singers represent a wide range of personal folk song styles and it is hoped that they will encourage others to do likewise.

Notes © Peter Kennedy, 1960