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Anthologies

The Sanctuary Compilations


The Rocky Road to Dublin: The Best of Irish Folk
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  • The Rocky Road to Dublin: The Best of Irish Folk
    • 2006 - Sanctuary CMETD 1274 CD (x3)

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  • Disc Two
    1. Ye Jacobites By Name — The Johnstons: from The Barley Corn (1969)
    2. The Handsome Cabin Boy — Sweeney's Men: from Sweeney's Men (1968)
    3. The Sea Around Us Dominic Behan: from Arkle (1965)
    4. The Reluctant Patriot — The Tinkers
    5. Kitty Come Down From Limerick — The Dubliners: from Mainly Barney (1966)
    6. Donegal Reel — Grehan Sisters: from On the Galtymore Mountains (1967)
    7. Kitty Magee — Michael O'Duffy
    8. Planxty Davy Finbar Furey: from Traditional Irish Pipe Music (1969)
    9. The Blarney Stone — Kevin Lynch & The Regal Sound
    10. He Was A Quare One — The Broadsiders: from The Broadsiders (1970)
    11. Morrison's/The Bridge's Favourite — The Glenside Ceili Band
    12. Bonnie Irish Boy — Margo & The Keynotes
    13. Old Maid In A Garret — Sweeney's Men: from Pye PMM.608 [7"] (1967)
    14. Drops Of Brandy — Finbar and Eddie Furey: from The Dawning of the Day (1972)
    15. Paddy's Green Shamrock Shore — The Johnstons: from The Barley Corn (1969)
    16. Black Velvet Band — Johnny Kelly & The Capitol Showband
    17. The Sash My Father Wore/Courtin' In The Kitchen/Dicey Riley/Bog Down In The Valley-O/One Eyed Riley — The Broadsiders: from The Broadsiders (1970)
    18. The Jolly Ploughboy — The Tinkers
    19. The Enniskillen Dragoons The Ludlows: from Pye 7N 17319 [7"] (1967)
    20. Arkle — Dominic Behan: from Arkle (1965)
    21. Wild Rover — The Dubliners: from The Dubliners (1964)
  • Disc Three
    1. Off To Dublin In The Green — The Dubliners: TRA SP8 [7"] from (1966)
    2. The Fenians From Cahirciveen — The Johnstons: from The Barley Corn (1969)
    3. Trip To Durrow — The Glenside Ceili Band
    4. Willy O' Winsbury — Sweeney's Men: from Sweeney's Men (1968)
    5. Rakish Paddy — Finbar Furey: from Traditional Irish Pipe Music (1969)
    6. Jigs (Medley) — Grehan Sisters: from On the Galtymore Mountains (1967)
    7. Belfast Town (Medley) — Mick Moloney: from We Have Met Together (1973)
    8. Trip To Athlone/Pat McGillarney — Na Fili
    9. Those Brown Eyes — Johnny McEvoy
    10. Carron Lough Bay — Finbar and Eddie Furey: from The Lonesome Boatman (1969)
    11. The Irish Soldier — Pat Lynch and The Airchords
    12. The Glenside Nos. 1 & 2 — The Glenside Ceili Band
    13. Sally O — The Broadsiders: from The Broadsiders (1970)
    14. Johnny Lad — The Ludlows: from Pye 7N 17221 [7"] (1966)
    15. The Rovin' Ploughboy — The Barley Cove Folk
    16. The Dublin Jack Of All Trades — The Johnstons: from The Johnstons (1968)
    17. The Hag With The Money — Finbar Furey: from Traditional Irish Pipe Music (1969)
    18. Roisin Dubh — The Dubliners: from TRA SP3 [7"] (1965)
    19. Rifles Of The I R A — The Tinkers
    20. The Patriot Game — Dominic Behan: from Arkle (1965)
    21. God Save Ireland — Grehan Sisters: from TRA SP20 [7"] (1968)

Notes

The folk revival that took place during the Sixties introduced a whole new audience to traditional folksong, while also bringing to the fore the concept of the earnest young singer/songwriter. Given the grassroots nature of the movement, it was inevitable that the various regions would throw up their own local heroes. In Ireland, the ceilidh bands and balladeers that had always been at the heart of the indigenous music scene continued to be a popular attraction. However, they were joined by a new wave of acts with broader appeal. The Dubliners quickly moved from the local clubs and bars to become the public face of Irish folk, while family-based groups like the Johnstons, the Ludlows and The Fureys (Finbar and Eddie Furey) achieved considerable success with their own take on the genre. Featuring typically perceptive liners from noted Irish commentator Paddy Murphy, The Rocky Road To Dublin stretches all the way from the legendary playwright and songwriter Dominic Behan to psychedelic folk avatars Sweeney's Men for a definitive look at the Irish folk scene of the Sixties.

Castle, 2006

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Border Lands: The Best of Scottish Folk
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  • Border Lands: The Best of Scottish Folk
    • 2006 - Sanctuary CMETD 1275 CD

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  • Disc Two
    1. Why Don't They Come Back To Dunoon — The Humblebums
    2. Goodbye Booze — Hamish Imlach: from Ballads of Booze (1969)
    3. Dainty Davy — Ian Campbell: from Tam O'Shanter: Poems and songs from Robert Burns (1968)
    4. Bruton Town — Alex Campbell: from Yours Aye, Alex (1966)
    5. Henry Martin — Bert Jansch
    6. Wild Flying Dove — Josh MacRae: from Josh MacRae (1966)
    7. Whiskey Drinkers — Watt Nicoll: from The Ballad of the Bog (1968)
    8. Coorie Doon — Matt McGinn: from Honesty Is Out Of the Fashion (1968)
    9. The Trooper And The Maid — Archie Fisher: from Archie Fisher (1968)
    10. Let No Man Steal Your Thyme — Shelagh McDonald
    11. Rattlin' Roarin' Willie — Contraband
    12. The Shearing — Silly Wizard: from Silly Wizard (1976)
    13. Farewell To Nova Scotia — The McCalmans: from Burn the Witch (1978)
    14. Ye Jacobites By Name — Owen Hand: from I Loved a Lass (1966)
    15. The Overgate — Alex Campbell: from Alex Campbell (1965)
    16. The Green Fields Of Dundee — Watt Nicoll: from The Ballad of the Bog (1968)
    17. Mary Skeffington — Gerry Rafferty
    18. Farewell To Tarwathy — The Ian Campbell Folk Group: from New Impressions (1967)
    19. Glasgow Central — Billy Connolly
    20. The Dundee Ghost — Matt McGinn: from Honesty Is Out Of the Fashion (1968)
    21. Johnny Faa Lorna Campbell: from The Cock Doth Craw: Ballads from Scotland (1968)
    22. The McGregors — Hamish Imlach: from The Two Sides of Hamish Imlach (1968)
    23. The Lion (Edinburgh Castle) — The McCalmans: from Burn the Witch (1978)
    24. My Love's In Germany — Silly Wizard: from Silly Wizard (1976)
  • Disc Three
    1. Steamboat Row — Gerry Rafferty
    2. Jenny Gray's Whiskey — Silly Wizard: from Silly Wizard (1976)
    3. The Devil's Fiddle — Contraband
    4. Highland Harry — The Ian Campbell Folk Group: from Four Highland Songs (1968)
    5. Don't You Put Me Down — Alex Campbell: from My Old Gibson Guitar (1966)
    6. Inveray (The Baron Of Brackley) — Owen Hand: from I Loved a Lass (1966)
    7. Open The Door Softly — Archie Fisher: from Archie Fisher (1968)
    8. The Scottish Breakaway — Hamish Imlach: from TRA SP 11 (1966)
    9. Rob Roy McGregor — Matt McGinn: from Matt McGinn Again (1967)
    10. The Quizling History Of Scotland — Watt Nicoll: from Watt is a Four Letter Word (1968)
    11. If It Wasnae For Your Wellies — Billy Connolly
    12. Baron James McPhait (The Celtic Rangers Song) — Josh MacRae
    13. John Anderson — Ian Campbell: from Tam O'Shanter: Poems and songs from Robert Burns (1968)
    14. Fare Ye Well Ye Mormond Braes — The McCalmans: from Burn the Witch (1978)
    15. Everybody Knows That — The Humblebums
    16. Love Is Teasing — Alex Campbell: from Alex Campbell (1965)
    17. Jimmy Wilson — Owen Hand: from Something New (1965)
    18. Loch Lomond — Matt McGinn: from Little Ticks of Time (1969)
    19. The Dundee Cat — Hamish Imlach: from Before and After (1967)
    20. Ca' The Ewes — Watt Nicoll: from Nice To Be Nice (1971)
    21. Matt Highland — Archie Fisher: from Archie Fisher (1968)
    22. The Canny Miner Lad — The Ian Campbell Folk Group: from Coaldust Ballads (1965)
    23. My Singing Bird — Gerry Rafferty
    24. A Man's A Man's For A' That — The McCalmans: from The Smuggler (1975)

Notes

The British folk revival that took place at club level during the Sixties introduced a whole new audience to traditional folksong, while also bringing to the fore the concept of the earnest young singer/songwriter. Given the grassroots nature of the movement, it was inevitable that regional scenes would throw up their own local heroes. In Scotland, the grizzled likes of Hamish Imlach, Matt McGinn and Alex Campbell would underpin the scene while providing inspiration for a slightly younger generation of talents (Bert Jansch, Gerry Rafferty, Billy Connolly), whose immersion in contemporary pop culture would enable them to make a greater impact on the mainstream. Featuring typically perceptive liners from noted Celt commentator Hamish MacTavish, Border Lands incorporates all the era's main players - the club raconteurs, the acoustic strummers, the folksong revivalists, the electric folk rockers - for a definitive look at the heyday of the Scottish folk scene.

Castle, 2006

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