image

Anthologies

The Newport Folk Festival


Folk Festival At Newport — Volume 1 (1959)
image 
  • Folk Festival At Newport — Volume 1
    • 1959 - Vanguard VRS-9062 LP

image  Show Details

image  Hide Details

  • Side One
    1. The Bells of Rhymney — Pete Seeger—Accompanying himself on the 12-string guitar & banjo
    2. a. One Grain of Sand & b. Abiyoyo — Pete Seeger—Accompanying himself on the 12-string guitar & banjo
    3. Hey Daroma — Martha Schlamme—Accompanied by Frank Hamilton, guitar
    4. There's a Hole in the Bucket — Martha Schlamme—Accompanied by Frank Hamilton, guitar
    5. Que Bonita Bandeira — Martha Schlamme—Accompanied by Frank Hamilton, guitar
  • Side Two
    1. Lonesome Traveller — Leon Bibb—Accompanied by John Staubeur, guitar, and Eric Weisberg, bass
    2. Every Night When the Sun Goes In — Leon Bibb—Accompanied by John Staubeur, guitar, and Eric Weisberg, bass
    3. Times are Getting Hard — Leon Bibb—Accompanied by John Staubeur, guitar, and Eric Weisberg, bass
    4. Sinner Man — Leon Bibb—Accompanied by John Staubeur, guitar, and Eric Weisberg, bass
    5. Cobbler's Song Tom Makem
    6. Mountain Dew Pat Clancy—Accompanied by Tom Makem on the penny-whistle and Pete Seeger, banjo
    7. Careless Love — Pete Seeger—Accompanying himself on the banjo

Sleeve Notes (Excerpts)

Irish song and lore were eloquently represented at Newport by TOMMY MAKEM. Steeped in the musical and poetical tradition of the Gael, he is an artist as indigenous to his world as Big Bill Broonzy was to his. He is an actor as well as a singer; the two crafts are juicily fused in the songs. No "prettiness", no pretense in his performance, he reveals himself; and in a larger sense, his verdant heritage. PATRICK CLANCY about whom all this is equally true, is heard here in "Mountain Dew."

Top Index

The Newport Folk Festival—1960 Volume 1
image 
  • The Newport Folk Festival—1960 Volume 1
    • 1960 - Vanguard VRS-9083 LP

image  Show Details

image  Hide Details

  • Side One
    1. East Virginia Blues: Pete Seeger, accompanying himself on banjo
    2. In The Evening: Pete Seeger, accompanying himself on banjo
    3. Hieland Laddie: Pete Seeger, accompanying himself on banjo, with and guitar by Oscar Brand
    4. Hobo Blues (or Dusty Road) Maudie: John Lee Hooker, accompanying himself on guitar, with Bill Lee, string bass
    5. Tupolo (or Backwater Blues): John Lee Hooker, accompanying himself on guitar, with Bill Lee, string bass
    6. A Si Mon Moine Voulait Danser: Alan Mills, with Jean Carignan playing fiddle
    7. Le Reel Du Pendu - Instrumental—  Jean Carignan, fiddle solo
    8. I Know An Old Lady: Alan Mills, unaccompanied vocal
    9. La Bastringue: Alan Mills, with Jean Carignan playing fiddle
  • Side Two
    1. Brian Boru - Instrumental: Tom Makem, bagpipe solo
    2. Johnny, I Hardly Knew Ye
    3. The Whistling Gypsy: Tom Makem, with Pete Seeger, banjo, and Eric Weisberg, guitar
    4. Old Joe Clark: Jimmy Driftwood, accompanying himself on the bow, with Peter Seeger, banjo
    5. The Unfortunate Man: Jimmy Driftwood, accompanying himself on guitar
    6. Roll In My Sweet Baby's Arms: The New Lost City Ramblers (Mike Seeger, Tom Paley and John Cohen, who also plays—the following instruments: Seeger, fiddle and autoharp; Paley, banjo; Cohen, guitar)
    7. The Man Of Constant Sorrow: Mike Seeger, of The New Lost City Ramblers, with autoharp
    8. Foggy Mountain Top: The New Lost City Ramblers, as on No. 6

Sleeve Notes (Excerpts)

It was Tommy Makem, of County Armaghm, Ireland, strutting back and forth on the stage and piping away. And then the 27-year-old singer who regularly performs with the Clancy Brothers, put down the bagpipes and started to sing with his own very able set of vocal pipes. You can heat Makem, supported by Pete Seeger and Eric Weisberg, in two richly different moods: the sardonic, defiant, declaratory singer reviling the effects of war in "Johnny I Hardly Knew Ye," and the lyric, playful minstrel in "The Whistling Gypsy."

Top Index

The Newport Folk Festival 1960 — Volume 2
image 
  • The Newport Folk Festival 1960 — Volume 2
    • 1960 - Vanguard VRS-9084 LP

image  Show Details

image  Hide Details

  • Side One
    1. This Little Light Of Mine
    2. Wayfaring Stranger
      • Bob Gibson, accompanying himself on banjo, with Dick Rosmini, guitar, and Herb Brown, bass
    3. You Can Tell The World
    4. Well, Well, Well
      • Bob Gibson and Bob Camp, with Bob Gibson, accompanying on banjo, Dick Rosmini, guitar and Herb Brown, bass
    5. Railroad Bill
    6. The Cat Came Back
      • Cisco Houston, accompanying himself on guitar
    7. Hush Little Baby
    8. The Lavender Cowboy
    9. Blood On The Saddle
      • Ed McCurdy, accompanying himself on guitar
  • Side Two
    1. Handsome Molly
    2. Willie Moore
      • Peggy Seeger, accompanying herself on banjo
    3. Lang A Growing
    4. The Ballad Of Springhill
      • Peggy Seeger and Ewan MacColl, with Peggy Seeger, banjo
    5. Salty Dog Blues
    6. Before I Met You
    7. Cabin On The Hill
    8. Jimmy Brown
      • Lester Flatt, vocal and guitar; Earl Scruggs, banjo (and guitar on "Cabin on the Hill"); and The Foggy Mountain Boys (Curly Sechler, mandolin; Paul Warren, fiddle; Uncle Josh, dobro guitar; Cousin Jake, bass fiddle)

Sleeve Notes

The Newport Folk Festival, which met in joyful conclave for its second annual meeting on June 24 to June 26, 1960, was a musical gathering the likes of which have not been seen before. There was a quality of a United Nations meeting about it, with performers from six foreign countries and songs from a dozen other nations. It was, at the same time, a Congress of the United States of America, with banjo pickers and singers and guitar strummers from as far away as California, and Louisiana as duly appointed delegates. And further, it was a singing convention that cut across all definitions and categories: there were primitive, simple singers, and sophisticated complicated singers; there were traditional performers who learned what they knew from their folks and their folks' folks; there were some hillbillies and many citybillies, concert performers and just plain performers.

It was a melange and a mixed brew. But, the credit here goes to the festival's producers, Albert B. Grossman and George Wein, to the three Masters of Ceremonies, Oscar Brand, Studs Turkel and John Greenway, and to the whole army of musicians who assembled, that the proceedings did not bog down in a procedural tangle or a babel of different languages. Far from that — the summit meeting of folk musicians at Newport found that through the international language of a people's music, things could move as smooth as silk. Somehow, everyone was talking everyone else's language. And that happened, despite the many accents and dialects and varied styles of expression the musicians were using.

The success of the second Newport Folk Festival was all the more an artistic triumph because so many diverse schools of thought were represented. On this record, as well as on the companion Vanguard recording, the whole gamut of styles from nearly popular to ethnic are represented.

To start the disc is a bought, hard-driving young trio; Bob Gibson, with Dick Rosmini, guitarist, and Herb Brown on bass. Gibson had endeared himself to the Newport audience at the 1959 festival not only with his own performing, but by introducing the amazing talent of Joan Baez. Gibson had another surprise in store, this time, by introducing the young singer, Bob Camp. Here is popularized folk music with a city sophistication and an urban polish to it.

If the Newport Festival was a meeting of ambassadors, it was, of course, essential that Cisco Houston be there. For he had been in charge of the group of American folk singers, Brownie McGhee, Sonny Terry and Marilyn Child, who went to India last winter on a triumphal tour. At Newport, Cisco was again the veteran of the road, the traveler of the "sun-burned thumb and the side-door Pullman," singing "Railroad Bill" as if the song were all his. And listen to the delicious wit in "The Cat Came Back" as Cisco adds a fillip of modernity to one of the final verses.

For the big, bold balladeer, Ed McCurdy, it was a triumphant return to Newport, for his first festival appearance had been a clattering success. Here McCurdy, with his smooth, rich voice, is alternately lyric and sardonic. And in "Blood on the Saddle" we have some delicious broad satire delivered in the inimitable McCurdy fashion.

image Two of the staunchest traditionalists are on this record, Peggy Seeger and Ewan MacColl. Miss Seeger, the third of the famous family of folk musicians represented at the festival, arrived not from her native America, but from Britain, where she had been living and performing.

There was just a trace of a newly inherited burr in Miss Seeger's speaking voice, but she had lost none of her American roots in gaining those of England and Scotland. From the moment her softly caressing mountain banjo opens side two of this record. we know the Seeger touch, and from the moment we hear her singing the plaintive, longing "Handsome Molly" we know the artist's touch. Miss Seeger stays in the vein of love lost in "Willie Moore" with its courtly love and ladies fair.

Ewan MacColl, who takes over next, is by general estimation, one of the leading performers of Scotland and Britain. Especially winning are his craggy Scottish songs, with the burr and the tang of the language and the heather in his voice. And here he sings that curious long ballad, "Lang A'Growing," a stunning story known in Irish tradition as well as Scottish. It is interesting to compare MacColl's version as heard here, with those of Seamus Ennis or Liam Clancy. In this unaccompanied performance. MacColl's rich vibrato shakes out the wistful story like the running through the rushes. Miss Seeger and MacColl then sing together, as they do so often and so well, a song of their own composition, "The Ballad of Springhill," which memorializes a tragedy in a Nova Scotia mine. In it the past, the present and the future are joined.

The love of Bluegrass in the north is one of the most exciting developments of the burgeoning folksong revival. At Newport, to represent the excitement and virtuosity of Bluegrass, was the band that many feel is the foremost in the field — Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs, and the Foggy Mountain Boys. In the four numbers here, the stars of the "Grand Old Opry" and the beloved country performers run the Bluegrass gamut, from the acerbic and bright "Salty Dog" to white gospel songs. More banjoists have been influenced and astounded by the flashing picking of Earl Scruggs than by any other instrumentalists in the field. But Earl didn't rest on his banjo laurels. On "Jimmy Brown," he can be heard playing his distinctive guitar. The Foggy Mountain Boys are Curly Sechler, who plays mandolin, Paul Warren, fiddler, Uncle Josh, playing the dobro guitar, and Cousin Jake, bass fiddle.

As it had been for the whole exciting weekend, there were delights and surprises for the music lover at every turn of the road. Turn on your phonograph and join the throng at Newport in traveling that exciting road.

Notes by Stacey William


About the Recording
All of the performances on this disc were recorded by Vanguard engineers on location at the Newport, R.I., Folk Music Festival. Specially designed microphones, tape recorders and amplifiers were used to produce Vanguard Quality Control sound, embodying a frequency response which covers the entire range of human hearing and embraces the full gamut of vocal and instrumental sonorities. Those with wide-range playback systems should compensate for the RIAA curve. Although a single-channel recording, this disc is also playable with any stereophonic cartridge, and its richness of sound is further enhanced when played through a stereophonic system. Vanguard Quality Control recordings are designed in music, performance and recorded sound to be permanent and lasting treasures of any record library.

Peggy Seeger and Ewan MacColl appear through arrangement with Folkways Records and Riverside Records.
Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs appear through courtesy of Columbia Records.

Top Index

The Folk Music Of The Newport Folk Festival (1959-1960)
image 
  • The Folk Music Of The Newport Folk Festival (1959-1960)
    • 1961 - Folkways FA2431 LP

image  Show Details

image  Hide Details

  • Side One
    1. On the Banks of the Don — O.J. Abbott
    2. Barley Grain — O.J. Abbott and Pete Seeger
    3. Stranger Blues — Willie Thomas and Butch Cage
    4. 44 Blues — Willie Thomas and Butch Cage
    5. Bonny Bunch of Roses-O Paddy Clancy
    6. Fair Ellender — Mike Seeger
  • Side Two
    1. Cumberland Mountain Bear Chase — Pete Seeger
    2. Citadel Hill — Alan Mills
    3. Cod Liver Oil — Alan Mills
    4. Stranger Blues (I'm a Stranger Here) — Frank Hamilton
    5. I Am a Pilgrim — Frank Hamilton

  • Credits
    • Producer: Irwin Silber
    • Designer: Interdesign
    • Photographer (Cover): David Gahr

Top Index

Folk Festival at Newport Volume 1 (59/60)
image 
  • Folk Festival at Newport Volume 1 (59/60)
    • 1963 - King/Vanguard MH-116 LP

image  Show Details

image  Hide Details

  • Side One
    1. East Virginia Blues — Pete Seeger
    2. In The Evening — Pete Seeger
    3. Hieland Laddie — Pete Seeger (with Oscar Brand)
    4. Lang A-Growing Ewan MacColl
    5. The Ballad Of Springhill — Peggy Seeger & Ewan MacColl
    6. Virgin Mary Had One Son — Joan Baez & Bob Gibson
    7. We Are Crossing The Jordan River — Joan Baez & Bob Gibson
  • Side Two
    1. What're We Going To Do With The Baby-Oh — Jean Ritchie
    2. Pretty Saro — Jean Ritchie
    3. Shady Grove — Jean Ritchie
    4. Paper Of Pins Jean Ritchie (with Oscar Brand)
    5. Which Side Are You On — Oscar Brand
    6. The Hangman, (or The Maid Freed From The Gallows) — John Jacob Niles
    7. Mountain Dew Pat Clancy
    8. Careless Love — Pete Seeger

Top Index

Traditional Music at Newport 1964 Part Two
image 
  • Traditional Music at Newport 1964 Part Two
    • Vanguard VRS-9183/VSD-79183 LP

image  Show Details

image  Hide Details

  • Side One
    • CLAYTON McMICHEN — fiddle, with FRANK WAKEFIELD, guitar
      1. Old Joe Clark
      2. Bile them Cabbage Down
    • PHIPPS FAMILY, with two guitars and autoharp
      1. Anchored His Love
      2. God Gave Noah the Rainbow Sign
    • ROBERT PETE WILLIAMS, with guitar
      1. Bulldog Blues
    • SEAMUS ENNIS
      1. Did the Rum-Do-Daddy (pennywhistle)
      2. Piper on the Hearth (uilleann pipes)
      3. What'll Ye Do (with pennywhistle)
      4. Father's Maid
    • FRANK PROFFITT
      1. My Home's Across the Blue Ridge Mountains (with banjo)
      2. Poor Man (with dulcimer)
    • GEORGIA SEA ISLAND SINGERS
      1. Down in the Mire
  • Side Two
    • MISSISSIPPI JOHN HURT, with guitar
      1. Coffee Blues
    • GLENN OHRLIN, with guitar
      1. Montana is My Home
      2. The Chickens they Grow Tall
    • JEAN RITCHIE
      1. 'Tis the Gift to be Simple (with dulcimer)
      2. Coin' to Boston (with Edna Ritchie and the Hindman School Dancers)
    • ALMEDA RIDDLE
      1. The Hangman
    • PHOEBA AND ROSCOE PARSONS, fiddle and sticks
      1. Sourwood Mountain
      2. Shortening Bread
    • REVEREND ROBERT WILKINS, with guitar
      1. I Wish I Was in Heaven Sitting Down
      2. Thank You Jesus (with the Georgia Sea Island Singers)

  • Credits
    • Recorded live at the Newport Folk Festival, July 23-26
    • Compiled and programmed by Ralph Rinzler with the assistance of Jack Lathrop
    • Recording Engineers: Marc Aubort, Jack Bryan, Ed Friedner
    • Assistant Engineer: David Gude
    • Tape Editor: Jack Lothrop

Top Index