image

England

Redd Sullivan

Redd Sullivan


Blues At Sunrise
Gerry Lockran, Redd Sullivan and Dave Travis
image 
  • Blues At Sunrise
    • 1969 - Fidelity STFID 2165 LP
    • 1969 - Saga STFID 2165 LP

image  Show Album Details

image  Hide Album Details

image
  • Side One
    1. Sweet Little Lover (Travis)
    2. Baby Please Don't Go (Trad., Arr. — Lockran)
    3. She Loves So Good (Travis)
    4. McKinley Morganfield (Thomas)
    5. Cornbread, Peas & Black Molasses (Trad., Arr. — Lockran)
    6. I've Had My Fun (Trad., Arr. — Sullivan)
  • Side Two
    1. I'll Be Leaving In The Morning (Travis)
    2. Late Night Flyer (Travis)
    3. Good Morning Southside (Travis)
    4. Frisco Breakdown (Travis)
    5. Going Down To Memphis (Travis)

  • Musicians
    • Dave Travis: Vocals (Tracks: B1, B2, B3, B5)
    • Gerry Lockran: Vocals (Tracks: A2, A5)
    • Redd Sullivan: Vocals (Tracks: A1, A3, A6)
    • Alan Thomas: Piano (Tracks: A1, A3, A4, A6, B1 to B5)
    • Dave Travis: Slide Guitar (Tracks: B1, B3)
    • Gerry Lockran: Guitar (Tracks: A2, A5), Rhythm Guitar (Tracks: A1, A3, A6, B4)
    • Lloyd Courtenay: Drums (Tracks: A1, A3, B1 to B5)
    • Ted Hatton: Lead Guitar (Tracks: A3, B1 to B5)
    • Terry Nicholson: Bass (Tracks: A1, A2, B1 to B5)

Sleeve Notes

"Blues and trouble walk right in, hand in hand", states an old saying. Well it can happen that way, but for the great majority of young players it has been pretty good. There is a Blues boom and it means a good time for the majority of British Bluesmen.

But what about the music? Blues are a simple form of music and a tough one, as years of hard wear have shown. You can shake it, you can break it, but they come up again, time after time. Even though some people tend to complain at the 'devaluation' which popularity is said to have brought, it must be remembered that the Blues started as popular music. Travelling newspapers, singers, entertainers, dance bands, historical balladeers — Bluesmen were expected to be all these things. If you do all this properly you are likely to be popular. So the complaint is not based on the quality, it is based on quantity.

This is not the first time that Blues records have sold in quantity. Back in the 20's Bessie Smith, Blind Lemon Jefferson, Lonnie Johnson and others, sold hundreds of thousands of records. They were expected to; no one complained that they were "commercial". And that is odd, since it is mainly from the ranks of the present day Jefferson fans, that most of these complaints originate.

What about this record, though? Dave Travis — now, there's a familiar name — and Gerry Lockran, who has been a popular Blues artist for some time, together with Redd Sullivan, share the vocals. There is also a fine piano track by Alan Thomas. Terry Hatton, on guitar, Terry Nicholson, on bass guitar and Lloyd Courtenay, on drums add their support to a Blues sound which ranges wider than most bands tend to do. It is good to hear this range of music coming from Britain. It is a good sound!

ALEXIS KORNER

index

Folk On Friday
Anthology
image 
  • Folk On Friday
    • 1970 - BBC Records REC 95S LP

image  Show Album Details

image  Hide Album Details

  • Side One
    1. Talcahuano Girls — Robin Dransfield and Barry Dransfield
    2. Bold William Taylor — Tony Rose
    3. Dorset Is Beautiful — The Yetties
    4. The Death Of The Earl Of Essex — Dave & Toni Arthur
    5. Farewell Johnny Miner — The Northern Front
    6. Arthur McBride — Redd Sullivan
  • Side Two
    1. Dan The Dustman — The Yetties
    2. Andy's Gone With Cattle — Redd Sullivan
    3. Two Pretty Boys — Dave & Toni Arthur
    4. Compliments Returned — Tony Rose
    5. Ah Cud Hew — The Northern Front
    6. Instrumental Medley — Robin Dransfield and Barry Dransfield

  • Credits
    • Producer: Frances Line

index

Hosts Of The Troubadour With Friends
Martin Winsor And Redd Sullivan
image 
  • Hosts Of The Troubadour With Friends
    • 1971 - Deacon DEA 1045 LP

image  Show Album Details

image  Hide Album Details

  • Side One
    1. Beans, Bacon And Gravy (Arr. — M. Winsor, R. Sullivan)
    2. The Queen Of Hearts (Trad., Arr. — M. Winsor)
    3. The Farming Servant (Trad., Arr. — R. Sullivan)
    4. The Hieland Widow's Lament (Trad., Arr., Music — J. Steel)
    5. I Wish I Could Shimmy Like My Sister Kate (A. J. Piron
  • Side Two
    1. The Ox-Driver's Song (Trad., Arr. — M. Winsor)
    2. Jock O'Hazeldean (Trad., Arr. — J. Steel)
    3. Firing The Mauritania (Redd Sullivan)
    4. MacCaffery (Trad., Arr. — M. Winsor)
    5. Trying To Make Heaven My Home (Trad., Arr. — M. Winsor, R. Sullivan)

  • Musicians
    • Redd Sullivan: Vocals
    • Martin Winsor: Vocals & Guitar
    • Jeannie Steel: Vocals
    • Alastair McDonald: Banjo, Guitar 6 & 12 String Guitar
    • Ian Campbell: Bass
  • Credits
    • Producer: Jim McLean
    • Cover Photograph: Alison Chapman
    • Deacon Records © 1971 England

Sleeve Notes

MARTIN WINSOR is a real life character, he has been a street-trader, a burglar, a chef, a layabout, a book seller, a fair ground barker — to name but a few of his many endeavours to keep the wolf from the bedroom. The one thing he has always done is to sing.

Since he caught the folk bug, in the early 1950s, he has been spreading the good word in clubs and pubs, cabarets, schools, old folks' homes, and even between sessions in a bingo hall. Although born in Liverpool, Martin has made home in London and is acknowledged as an authority on London Folklore and dialect, and is often asked to lecture on this theme. He has always been grouped with the "entertainers" rather than the folk-singers and this is perhaps because he thinks an audience should enjoy their evening at a club. His choice of material ranges from Scottish, Irish and English traditional songs to up-to-the minute parodies of current pop songs, and his performance may include a blues, spiritual, a Music-Hall ballad, a shanty or even comic monologue. In fact anything that takes his fancy becomes part of his repertoire.

He known for his fine performances at clubs and concerts all over the country and is no stranger to radio and television.

REDD SULLIVAN has been singing in folk-clubs since 1953, when he appeared in one of the first London Folk-song clubs in Gerrard Street. Since then he has appeared at the Poles Apart Folk Club in Auckland, New Zealand, the Newport Folk Festival (1967), at a concert for the inmates of Wormwood Scrubs college of Further Education, one of the largest Borstal Institutions in London and was also a street busker for five years.

Redd has sung the background for a cartoon on navigation lights for amateur yachtsmen on B.B.C. T.V., has appeared at the Royal Festival Hall, the Queen Elizabeth Hall, the Liverpool Philharmonic and sung on Southern T.V., Tyne-Tees T.V. and B.B.C. 2 T.V. for Ludovic Kennedy in a programme about street musicians. His Radio broadcasts are numerous: Easy Beat, Roundabout, Country Meets Folk, Folk on Friday and various spots on New Zealand Radio and Television when ha sang at the Wellington Folk Festival of 1967. Redd Sullivan is perhaps unusual in that he sings unaccompanied, but during the set in a club, he is always conscious of the audience. As his repertoire includes songs from Ireland, Scotland, the London Music-Hall, Jamaica, sea-shanties, stories and jokes, he keeps the accent very much on entertainment

THE TROUBADOUR must be London's oldest continuously running Folk-club, going back well over fifteen years and still thriving under the more than able management of Redd Sullivan and Martin Winsor. On Saturday nights from 10:30 p.m. until 2 a.m. (or thereabouts) visitors from all over Europe and America flock to the Troubadour in Old Brampton Road and enjoy four or five hours of Folk-music, traditional or contemporary, because neither Martin nor Redd impose any strict club policy. In fact the club encourages a "sing anything" attitude.

A list of people who have sung at the Troubadour would read like a Who's Who of Folk-singers, Tom Paxton, Bob Dylan, Shirley Collins, Buffy St. Marie, Louis Killen, Alex Campbell, Noel Murphy, Martin Carthy, Nigel Denver, Paul Simon, Stefan Grossman, Dominic Behan — the list is infinite.

Martin Winsor says that Raquel Walsh came in the other day. She didn't sing — but then she didn't have to!

FRIENDS — JEANNIE STEEL from Polmont, Scotland, is the Club Secretary and not only takes in the money at the door, ejects drunks and keeps the peace but shows another facet of her versatility by singing two very fine ballads on this album and joins in the chorus of some of the other tracks. She also wrote the music for the 'Hieland Widow's Lament', and is an accomplished guitarist.

Along with Martin Winsor on 6 string guitar, Alistair McDonald and Ian Campbell provide first rate accompaniment.

ALASTAIR McDONALD, who is a well known recording artist in his own right, played banjo, 12 string and 6 string guitars. IAN CAMPBELL, a fellow Glaswegian, and probably one of the leading bass guitarists in Europe, accompanies brilliantly and tastefully.

image  Hide Album Details

index